Getting Started with Creo for Students | PTC Academic


Hi, my name is Alexander Ouellet and I’m a senior applications engineer here at the PTC Academic Program. Today I’m gonna give you
some helpful tips and tricks on using Creo. (upbeat music) One of the first things we need
to do before we get started is make sure we have the right hardware. In this case, a mouse with
a middle scroll wheel. If you don’t have one, it’s
actually really important that you do to use Creo,
so see if you can find one. All right, if you have your own files that’s absolutely fine. In this case, we’re gonna
show you where you can get some files from our “How to model almost anything.” curriculum if you don’t have files of you own. We actually keep all our how
to model almost anything files available for you on our website, ptc.com/academic-program/student. So, if you’re on that page, scroll down to the very bottom, and here on the bottom left, you’ll see how to model almost anything. If you click on that,
it’ll start a download. You can save those files to your desktop, or your downloads folder
and we’ll go from there as soon as you unzip them. So now that we have downloaded our files, one of the first things
we need to do is select the working directory. This is actually super important. So Creo doesn’t know
where to find your files when you first open it. You have to tell it what
folder you want to look in, and that’s what setting
our working directory is. If we don’t set a working directory, Creo has no way of finding
the projects, or assemblies, or parts that we want to work with. To find our working directory, what we do, is we open up Creo, and
you’ll see in the top left, there’s several options
that we can work with. From new, over to open,
select working directory, which is the option that we want, and then some other options, that if we’re changing
between projects we would use but we’re not going to touch right now. So we’re gonna click
select working directory, and by default your
working directory is the public documents folder. So if you were to open up Creo, and just start working,
that’s where all your items would be saved and where
it would look by default. Over here, we’re gonna
click our desktop because that’s where I saved my project folder. We’re gonna go how to
model almost anything, and then we’re gonna pick a
sub folder that has one of the assemblies that we want to work with. I’m gonna pick cool bike, and then from there if we hit OK, you’ll see in the bottom
left hand corner here, successfully changed the working
directory to our cool bike. So we’re good to go from there. Now once we have our
working directory set, we’re ready to actually open
up our files and use them. So to do that, with our
working directory set, we’re going to hit open, and you’ll see the folder
that it’s looking for, is exactly what we set it to, cool bike. So from there I’m gonna pick
this cool bike top assembly. Open it up. And there we go. So when we open up a
part or assembly in Creo, there’s actually two representations that we’ll see on screen. The first one here, is the actual graphical
building of the assembly. It includes things like the surfaces here, that I can click and manipulate
in all the different parts. On the other hand, there’s the procedural
representation of the model, which is over here in our model tree. Essentially, what it is, is it’s a recipe showing how this model, or how this assembly
was built step-by-step. So what we can do is, here
looking from the assembly level, if I pick on individual pieces
of the model, for instance, the bike frame, the wheel assembly, it will highlight them
in the graphics area. But if I further expand on a piece, such as this bike crank here, I can actually see the
procedures that were taken step-by-step into how to create that part. (woosh) So here we have our graphical
representation of the model, and there’s a few different ways that we can interact with it. One way, is just by left
clicking on different parts, or features, we can see them highlighted, both in the procedural representation, or the model tree on the left. But also in our graphics area
as we click through them. So there’s a few different
ways we can manipulate this. One is by just clicking
on it and dragging, to highlight different parts, like so. We can zoom in by using
our middle scroll wheel. We can also rotate, by clicking the middle
scroll wheel and dragging. From there if we shift, middle-click, we pan, so that’s the ability
to move the model left-right, up-down and so on and so forth. And then beyond that, if
there’s any moving parts, or kinematic constraints in the model, if we control-alt-left click,
you can see that we can actually move the model
through its constraints. In other words, let’s say
that we built a gear train, or a rack & pinion, or some
other mechanical constraint. By doing control-alt-left click, we’re able to move the model
through those constraints. Another key area of Creo,
is the graphics toolbar, located at the top for our model. The in-graphics toolbar is this bar, that is right above our model, whenever we’re working with it in Creo. And there’s a few key features
that can really help us as we’re working through Creo on it. One of the first key features
of the in-graphics toolbar is this refit option. So a lot of times we can
be working with a model, and let’s say that we
zoom in super super far, or we end up going super super far out, and we have no idea where our model is. I’ve lost it, what am I going to do? This option up here, refit, if I click it, snaps me
back to having the model in the center of the screen. It’s super useful, I use it all the time, and is definitely one of the
most helpful options in Creo. (woosh) Another option on the in-graphics toolbar, is our display style. I use this one a lot. There’s several different options here. By default, you’re probably
gonna be set to just shading, as a display style. But, I often use shading
with edges which essentially, what it does is, if we have it selected, each and every edge on
the model will be colored in black by default. So I can toggle between these to show you. Here, we see one smooth surface, and it can be kind of hard
to pick out where an edge is. Unless, we have shading
with edges selected. Another option in the in-graphics toolbar, is shading with reflections. Which basically gives
us a really nice smooth, polished rendering option,
with a shadow down below, and a reflection. Another key piece of
the in-graphics toolbar, is our display filters. What the display filters
allow us to do is, toggle on and off our datums. Datums are pieces of geometry
like planes, axis, points, coordinate systems, that
can help us as references, for creating new geometry. If we look up, in our
in-graphics tool bar, you can see plane display, by clicking those little
toggle on and off. Same thing with axis. Same thing with points. Same thing with coordinate systems. So with all of them hidden, I’m left with just the model on screen. The next thing I want to talk
about is the spin center. Which is not displayed in the toolbar, or on screen right now. To show the spin center, go up to your toolbar and right click. A drop-down menu will appear. Scroll down and click here,
to show the spin center. Now that we can see the spin center, displayed in the toolbar,
let’s talk about what it does. So, you can see it as
the last option here, before our simulate options, and it’s highlighted on screen right here. What the spin center is, is it finds the geometric
center of our model, and by default if it’s enabled, when I go to rotate the model, I will always rotate
about that spin center. If I toggle it off, what that does is, now whenever I go to rotate the model, it’s going to rotate
about wherever I click. So for instance, if I click over here, it’s going to rotate about that point. If I click over here, it’s going to rotate about that point, as opposed to if the
spin center is enabled, it’s going to rotate about the middle of the model every time. Another key area of Creo, is the tabs at the top
of our command toolbar. By default, we have a
number of different tabs. Starting with file, model,
analysis, live simulation, annotate, mannequin, tools, view, framework, applications and photo. One of the first tabs
we’re gonna touch on is the analysis tab. So it’s right over here, and this tab includes
a lot of different ways that we can basically perform analysis on our model or gather data. Whether that is doing a measurement, such as distance between
two points on our model. So for instance, I can
measure the distance between the spokes on the wheel and
see that it’s 74 inches. I can also do mass analysis, and a lot of other forms of
gathering data on this model. (woosh) Next up, is our tools tab. So over here, we have a
lot of different options, some of which you may be
familiar with such as, component interface or relations. Other ones are newer, such as
our augmented reality options. So starting in Creo 4.0, we have this augmented
reality suite that is included for free with Creo. What that allows us to
do is place a target, such as a spatial target, or a thingmark underneath our model, and then from there we can
actually publish it to the cloud, where you can share this
design with friends, coworkers, that sort of thing. Get their feedback on the model. And it’s a really great
way to share your designs, and collaborate with others. Before we wrap up, I want
to touch on a quick tip, for working between models,
closing, and saving your models. (woosh) If we want to close our model
but continue working in Creo, one of the best ways to do
it is to click this little X, up here, in the top left that says close. And now our model is gone
and if I want to open up a different assembly or a part, I can do so without having
to switch between the two. But, let’s say for a second
that I did that accidentally, and I haven’t saved my work, and I need to get it
back and I’m panicking. Fear not, Creo actually has a
built-in safeguard for this. So as long as Creo is still running, and I haven’t completely X’d out of it, I can still get my work back. And I can do that by going to in session, over here on the left, and you’ll see everything that I had open. So, what I was just working on
was this cool bike assembly. And If I double click that, you’ll see that all my
work is still there, my target from the last
tip that I gave is there, and I’m ready to continue working. (woosh) Now, let’s say that I am done working, I’ve saved my work and I
want to close out but I also need to open some new things, and there’s overlapping references, or I want to close out of
this assembly completely. What I can do, is I can go
over and close the model, and then, what I want to do to
clear out the memory of Creo, and to start something totally new, is I’m gonna click this
erase not displayed. And you’ll see that in here, erase not displayed will
show all the things that I have opened and if I’m okay
with getting rid of those, I’ll hit OK, and I’m good to go. The memory is totally cleared out. Now, if I were to go to in
session, there’s nothing there, and I’m ready to open
something completely new. (woosh) All right, that concludes our getting started with Creo video. If you have any questions
or liked it, comment below. And we’ve also included
the resources that we referenced in this video,
in the description. Awesome, have a good day. (upbeat music)

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